Claiming feminist space in the university the social organization of feminist teaching. by Michelle Webber

Cover of: Claiming feminist space in the university | Michelle Webber

Published .

Written in English

Read online

Subjects:

  • Feminism and higher education.,
  • College teaching -- Social aspects.,
  • Women in higher education.,
  • Women"s studies -- Social aspects.,
  • Feminism -- Study and teaching (Higher) -- Social aspects.

About the Edition

This study explores both pedagogy and course content in social science courses cross-listed with women"s studies. Drawing on the theoretical works of Dorothy Smith and Michel Foucault and utilizing in-depth interviews with eight women faculty, five women teaching assistants and nine students (eight women and one man), I examine the socially mediated arena of feminist teaching. I ask: to what extent is it possible to practice idealistic teaching, framed as feminist, in the contemporary masculinist university? I also analyze student resistance to feminist course content. Through this analysis I ask: what counts as knowledge for students in social science courses cross-listed with women"s studies?Numerous social relations work to organize classroom spaces. First, the social location of the course participants mediates the undergraduate university classroom. Age, gender, race, sexuality and so forth shape the local experiences of people in university classrooms. Second, one"s position as a sessional instructor, limited term faculty member or untenured faculty member organizes how one teaches. Here we see the extra-local relations of the university and the economy organize how departments staff their courses and departments. Third, extra-local social relations such as surveillance mechanisms materially represented in texts such as course evaluations and merit reviews contribute to the social organization of classrooms. Faculty find themselves practicing hidden feminist pedagogies, hesitating to teach from their preferred feminist perspective and attempting to appease students who might be critical of their use of feminist material. In the end these survival practices undermine efforts to position feminist knowledge as legitimate.

Book details

The Physical Object
Pagination290 leaves.
Number of Pages290
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19474884M
ISBN 100494026510

Download Claiming feminist space in the university

“Kern delves into the interlocking inequalities and systems of oppression that take concrete shape in cities, using an intersectional feminist approach to explore the gendered aspects of urban space an enjoyable and accessible book that not only contributes to urban feminist geography, but to urban planning and policy more broadly.”4/5(29).

In Feminist City: Claiming Space in the Man-Made World, Leslie Kern delves Claiming feminist space in the university book the interlocking inequalities and systems of oppression that take concrete shape in cities, using an intersectional feminist approach to explore the gendered aspects of urban space.

“Kern delves into the interlocking inequalities and systems of oppression that take concrete shape in cities, using an intersectional feminist approach to explore the gendered aspects of urban space an enjoyable and accessible book that not only contributes to urban feminist geography, but to urban planning and policy more broadly.”.

In this insightful scholarly work, Kern (Sex and the Revitalized City), a professor of geography and environment at Mount Allison University, uses the framework of “feminist geography” to explore.

Claiming Space: Some American Feminists Originators by Broude, Norma and Mary D. Gerrard and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at - Claiming Space Some American Feminist Originators - AbeBooks.

“Kern delves into the interlocking inequalities and systems of oppression that take concrete shape in cities, using an intersectional feminist approach to explore the gendered aspects of urban space an Claiming feminist space in the university book and accessible book that not only contributes to urban feminist geography, but to urban planning and policy more broadly.”.

In Leslie Kern ‘s new book, Feminist City: Claiming Space in a Man-made World, the professor of geography and environment and director of women’s and gender studies at Mount Allison University, provides an intersectional analysis of our urban environments through a combination of personal narrative, theory, and pop culture analysis.

To Leslie Kern, an urban geographer, associate professor at Mount Allison University, and the author of Feminist City: Claiming Space In The Man-Made World, out now from Verso Books.

A public space with enough toilets. A place where women can walk without harassment. In The Feminist City, through history, personal experience and popular culture Leslie Kern exposes what is hidden in plain sight: the social inequalities are built into our cities, homes, and neighbourhoods.

And offers an alternative vision of the feminist city. Leslie Kern is the author of two books on gender and cities, including Feminist City: Claiming Space in a Man-Made World (Verso). She holds a PhD in women’s studies from York University. CLAIMING*SPACES invites students, teachers, planners and researchers from the fields of architecture and spatial planning as well as interested parties to participate in the discourse in the form of discussions, lectures and workshops and to jointly design feminist positions and tools for a different kind of architecture and spatial planning.

Feminist City is an incredibly incisive look at cities and urban design through the lens of gender, while also inspecting how acts of claiming urban space affect other marginalized groups. Combining academic and lived experience, Leslie Kern's intersectional approach clearly lays out just how cities are failing and what it might mean to imagine.

‘Claiming the Public Space: The Mothers of Plaza de Mayo’ feminism, space and architecture This is the first such book to include a range of key texts from both within and outside architecture published over the last twenty years.

It also provides a clear framework by which to investigate the subject. Feminist film theory criticizes classical cinema for its stereotyped representation of women. Its aim is to adequately represent female subjectivity and female desire on the silver screen.

Buy the Hardcover Book Feminist City: Claiming Space In A Man-made World by Leslie Kern atCanada's largest bookstore. Free shipping and pickup in store on eligible orders. Feminist City is an ongoing experiment in living differently, living better, and living more justly in an urban world. We live in the city of.

I’m very happy to start this new series of podcasts with an interview of Leslie Kern, whose book Feminist City: Claiming Space in a Man-made World () I found so inspiring. Leslie is an associate professor of geography and environment and director of women's and gender studies at.

A classroom resource for instructors that includes full syllabi and teaching modules, Feminist Practices will be of interest to anyone who teaches in women’s, gender, and sexuality studies.

Feminist Practices is intended for use in classrooms and to spark creative ideas for teaching a diverse array of topics. What makes a practice feminist. What is at stake in claiming the feminist label.

Book Description: The emergence and evolution of Egyptian feminism is an integral, but previously untold, part of the history of modern Egypt.

Drawing upon a wide range of women's sources--memoirs, letters, essays, journalistic articles, fiction, treatises, and extensive oral histories--Margot Badran shows how Egyptian women assumed agency and in so doing subverted and refigured the.

This open-ended anthology is a journey into the very canon that Mary Daly has argued to be patriarchal and demeaning to women. This volume deauthorizes the official canon of Western philosophy and disrupts a related story told by some feminists who claim that Daly&’s work is unworthy of re-reading because it contains fatal errors.

The editors and contributors attempt to prove that Mary Daly 5/5(1). A funny, fact-driven, and illustrated field guide to how to live a feminist life in today's world, from the hosts of the hit Unladylike podcast. Get ready to get unladylike with this field guide to the what's, why's, and how's of intersectional feminism and practical h essential, inclusive, and illustrated explorations of what patriarchy looks like in the real world, authors Reviews: Feminist City: How to Build a More Just, Sustainable Toronto Novem 6pm Banting Institute on the University of Toronto Campus (Banting Institute (BI ), College Street) Toronto, ON To RSVP via —–> CLICK HERE Who is the city of Toronto built for.

How does our city actively re-enforce social inequalities. And, most importantly, how do we revolutionize urban life in the name of. Space is the area in which we claim and validate our identity, an identity which is an expression of full humanity.

Space is the location from which we can establish community and solidarity with others. To have a space is to have the ability to give shape to one's reality. Space is where we find self-knowledge and self-affirmation.

One's. Adrienne Cecile Rich (/ æ d r iː ɛ n /; [lacks stress] – Ma ) was an American poet, essayist and was called "one of the most widely read and influential poets of the second half of the 20th century", and was credited with bringing "the oppression of women and lesbians to the forefront of poetic discourse." Rich criticized rigid forms of feminist.

Claiming Space is a small, carefully curated exhibition with a big heart and ambitious agenda. It makes a compelling argument that feminist artists working in the late sixties into the early eighties had an enormous role in defining and expanding what constitutes feminist culture, and that any history of the period—social, political, cultural, or art historical—is woefully incomplete if.

By considering the development of feminism through an analysis of public space, Enke expands and revises the historiography of second-wave feminism. She suggests that the movement was so widespread because it was built by people who did not identify themselves as.

Feminist City is an incredibly incisive look at cities and urban design through the lens of gender, while also inspecting how acts of claiming urban space affect other marginalized groups. Combining academic and lived experience, Leslie Kern intersectional approach clearly lays out just how cities are failing and what it might mean to imagine a /5(82).

Leslie Kern wants your city to be feminist. Feminist City: A Field Guide combines memoir, feminist theory, pop culture, and geography to expose what is hidden in plain sight: the social inequalities built right into our cities, homes, and neighbourhoods.

Focusing on gendered experiences of the city, the books grapples with the challenge of claiming urban space amongst barriers designed to keep. Combining history, theory, and personal reflections on Kern’s own experiences in Western urban spaces, the book is an excellent introduction to feminist geography, a field that explores how gender intersects with physical space to structure pervasive systems of oppression.

This is one of many questions readers of the recently released book “Feminist City: Claiming Space in a Man-made World,” might ask themselves. Women in New York City who are primary caregivers. Feminist Trouble / Feminist Futures: Revisiting the “We” of Feminism.

The question of foundations—of who is the “we” feminists claim to be, to represent, and to make claims about—has been a central one for feminist theory. 13 At the heart of antifoundationalist accounts of feminism is the premise that for feminism to be a transformative project, it cannot rest upon essentialist.

LK: In the book, I talk about this very easy slippage among “feminist” spaces, or women’s empowerment and women claiming space in the city, and gentrification practices.

If we’re not careful, they really will dovetail together. The book develops the idea of third space feminism by looking at different discursive events including Yucatán's Socialist Revolution, El Partido Liberal Mexicano, and Texas social clubs.

Pérez's theoretical formation is credited with connecting Chicana and women of color feminist thought to the work of Michel Foucault, Jacques Lacan, Homi.

Geography is a subject which throughout its history has been dominated by men; men have undertaken the heroic explorations which form the mythology of its foundation, men have written most of its texts and, as many feminist geographers have remarked, mens interests have structured what counts as legitimate geographical knowledge.

This book offers a sustained examination of the masculinism of. Only when women come together to share and expose their experiences of male domination will Feminism and Women’s Liberation follow. But social media closes down that space, Megarry’s caution is right there in the title of this book, No Space of Our Own.”(Kathleen Barry, author of The Prostitution of Sexuality & Susan B.

Anthony: A Biography). The chapter first reviews normative proposals centered on coalitions as a “remedy” to intersectionality and the challenges it raises for feminism.

Then the chapter turns to feminist theorists Iris Young and Linda Zerilli, who have attempted to define an ethics of inclusion that could be appropriate for the feminist project.

Using the empirical material analyzed in previous chapters, this. Feminists claim to promote the advancement of women and gender equality, largely via the promotion of so-called sexual liberation, but their movement is leaving a wake of unhappy, unmarried, and childless women in its path, a real problem feminists seemingly refuse to entirely address.

Mothers Who Deliver: Feminist Interventions in Public and Interpersonal Discourse brings together essays that focus on mothering as an intelligent practice, deliberately reinvented and rearticulated by mothers themselves. The contributors to this watershed volume focus on subjects ranging from mothers in children s picture books and mothers writing blogs to global maternal activism and mothers.

A public space with enough toilets. A place where women can walk without harassment. In Feminist City, through history, personal experience and popular culture Leslie Kern exposes what is hidden in plain sight: the social inequalities built into our cities, homes, and neighborhoods.

Kern offers an alternative vision of the feminist city. Echoing other feminist ethnographers of the university- such as Amina Mama or Sara Ahmed – Maria do Mar Pereira thus concludes that what is desperately needed, is to: [ ] create the space for encounter and exchange, and the time to step back from the manic rhythm of the everyday and question our working and living conditions.

The new book “Feminist City” calls for reimagining urban infrastructure. Feminist City: Claiming Space in a Man-made and director of women's and gender studies at Mount Allison. Unladylike: A Field guide to Smashing the Patriarchy and Claiming Your Space by Cristen Conger and Caroline Ervin is the perfect manual for finding your feminist voice.But in her new book, “Feminist City: Claiming Space in a Man-Made World,” Kern argues that despite their potential, cities have also long failed — and continue to fail — women, and specifically women of color and women with spoke to The Lily about how she believes feminist cities could stymie domestic violence and better support parents, why urban planners should read.This book is an important and timely intervention into current debates within queer and feminist theory on the respective limits of these scholarly fields.

By recuperating a rich sense of 'ethics,' Lynne Huffer argues we must rethink the false boundaries between these two fields to arrive at a more robust understanding of the ethics of.

5427 views Tuesday, November 17, 2020